Ice rink, Schierke

Wettbewerb - Competition, 2. Preis


Indoor swimming pool, Stuttgart

Wettbewerb - Competition, Anerkennung


Arena Krakau

EU - offener Wettbewerb - EU - wide competition


Ice rink, Schierke

The existing ice rink in Schierke is with its history, architecture and location has become a landmark for the city.
The design of Schulitz Architects respects the heritage of the site and complements the existing ice rink with functional buildings and a new roof for modern ice scating events.

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Indoor swimming pool, Stuttgart

The new sports swim stadium combines the usage requirements for a compact solitaire with convenient A/V ratio. The cubic volume contains an almost square simming pool with grandstand, sports pool and diving pool. The changing area an foyer are located on the eastern side of the building. Developed from the optimal structural behavior of the roof structure, the roof plane making a wavy contrast to cubic appearance of the building.

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Arena Krakau

The new multi-purpose hall sits in the presentday landscape of the Aviation Park. Despite the sizable building volume and the 5000 car parking spaces required, interference in the natural landscape was to be kept to an absolute minimum. The project was therefore integrated in ist setting as a freestanding building in a way that recalls Cracow’s traditional Kopiec landscape and conceals the car-parking spaces. The latter, along with the ancillary functions of the arena, were placed in an artificial hillock that the spectators walk up in order to reach the main entrances. From the entrances, one arrives in aspacious foyer that accommodates the evening box office, cloakrooms, and sanitary facilities. The foyer then tapers, like the stream of visitors, in the direction of the stands and the staircases. The asymmetry of the foyer is matched by the
asymmetrical character of the seating tiers for the public. This layout allows the stage to be sensibly positioned to suit the different uses, ranging from theatre productions to sporting events, and optimises the audience’s view of the stage.

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Family and sports swimming pool, Gifhorn

In spite of a very narrow building site between the exiting swimming pools and the railway tracks, Schulitz Architects delivered a persuasive design regarding the functional requirements and the urban context.
Changing rooms and lavatories are situated next to the railway tracks, schielding the recreational areas from noise disturbance due to passing trains.

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City-Karree, Neubrandenburg

The historic old town of Neubrandenburg is characterised by a pattern of rectilinear block edge development, consisting mostly of residential accommodation and, along the more major streets, shops on the ground floor level. However, these shops are being negatively affected by competition from new shopping centres in the outlying districts. In response to this situation, a specialty store was to be planned on an incomplete block along the city walls between Turmstrasse and Neu-
torstrasse, in order to provide a centre that would attract passing customers for the shops. Our design completes the block along Neutorstrasse while maintaining an appropriate distance from the Neutor. A single-storey building placed in the interior of the block restores the street space of the Ringstrasse (ring road). The second level of the specialty store is placed on top of this volume. This storey, elliptical in shape, is separated from the
block perimeter with a low A/V relationship and, reflecting its special function, has a special form, without, however, abandoning the fundamental urban planning principle.

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Trade fair hall 27/28, Hannover

After the wide-span EXPO 2000 halls that were designed with a view to potential additional use for concerts and sports events, the DMAG wanted a hall that would be used exclusively for trade fair purposes, with columns set at moderate distances apart. The main concern was cost efficiency in both the construction and running of the building. Despite its simple construction and the low cost, our project can still be associated with the formally ambitious new generation of DMAG
halls. As construction, lighting, and ventilation have an impact on each other, the placing of the columns and the form of the trusses was developed integrally from the lighting and ventilation technology so as to achieve maximum performance at minimum cost.

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University library II, Braunschweig

Rather than negating the context of this former barracks site with a solitary building, the library is intended to pick up on the existing urban fabric and create a new quality through its special position alone. The library with its important communal function emphasises its special position by dividing up a strip of green space so as to define a sequence of spaces. By elevating the two upper floors above ground level, the axial visual relationships are preserved. A vertical circular opening in the building even allows an existing tree to be retained and integrated into the design concept. In contrast to libraries where the book stacks are clearly separated from the reading area, in this case the workplaces are placed directly beside the books. The elongated form of the building allows evenly lit workplaces. On the west side there are standard working areas, while on the east side small study carrels project out from the façade, creating areas where people can work in seclusion. Transparency and openness offer the library users a bright and friendly atmosphere.

The building, which is a steel composite structure with concrete fill, exemplifies lightweight elements, short construction times, low costs, good fire safety, and high flexibility in assembly.

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Plaza Theatre, Hannover

Even after the end of the world‘s fair, the openair theatre has continued to be a focal point on the plaza. The diagonal positioning of the performing area asked for a round form that contrasts with the dominant angular forms on the plaza and also exploits the existing slope in the site. During the EXPO, performances by music and theatre groups from all around the world were held here daily. The 1900-square-metre roof offered audiences and performers protection from sun and rain. The spaces for performing artists (dressing rooms and toilets) are provided underneath the stage in containers inserted there.
The stage can be used in two directions: diagonal towards the open central area of the plaza, or in the opposite direction towards the roofed, stepped area used for seating. While the membrane between the inner and outer rings diffuses the light, the stage is emphasised through the greater amount of light entering through inclined glazing that slopes to the north. For performances that require artificial lighting effects, the glass area can be blacked out by means of aluminium louvres. A ventilation joint between both roof areas extracts the heat produced by the lighting system or the entry of sunlight by means of natural thermal forces. The roof membrane stretches between a compression ring with a diameter of 49 metres that is inclined from north to south, and a 16-metrediameter tension ring that slopes towards the north and rests above the performance area. Tensioning the membrane (PTFE) creates a form that provides good acoustic conditions. The sheet steel gutter at the lower end of the membrane is separated from the compression tube by brackets that also carry cable conduits and the outer stage lighting. The trusses that carry the lighting and sound equipment above the stage consist entirely of standard, commercially available elements used in stage construction.

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Skywalk, Hannover

This commission resulted from the competition for the EXPO and trade fair railway station, which also included the Skywalk as the connection to the EXPO grounds. In our competition entry the Skywalk was, as called for in the competition, directly connected to the upper level of the railway station.The 340-metre-long Skywalk, a pedestrian bridge with spans of up to 28 metres elevated over an existing road and its approach roads, was intended to provide a symbol at the entrance to the EXPO. The competition called for a structure that was naturally ventilated and lit, made economical use of resources, and could be erected at a low cost in just five winter months between trade fair dates. In addition, the structure and façades were not to restrict or impede the view. Working from these requirements, we developed a concept that contrasted with tubular pedestrian bridges in which only the level at which pedestrians walk is used structurally and the tubular shell has to span the entire width of the bridge. Our concept is instead a double tube in which diagonal rods enable the pedestrian level as the lower chord to function together with the roof structure as the upper chord in a full-height structure. This concept meant that the façade is only spanned between these two levels and the thickness of the curved steel sections could be kept to just 40 mm. This allows a view through the structure that, even from the perspective of the pedestrian, is hardly obstructed at all. The glazed, weather-protected space has air intake openings at the foot of the façade and outlet openings in the roof that ensure natural ventilation without build-up of heat. The space is not heated, but the walking level is protected against frost. The building is divided into three fire compartments with two fire escape staircases located between the sections. 2

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Expo, canopies, communal areas

The requirement was for a canopy roof employed as a basic additive form with a striking appearance that, by means of repetition and its strong colouring and in conjunction with the modular service containers, would give the main axes of the EXPO grounds both continuity and identity. The form is determined by the performance required for the short period during which the canopy is used. All the connections in this light minimised structure are bolted. All parts are prefabricated in the works and, along with the foundations, could be taken down after the EXPO without causing any damage and used again elsewhere. The mem-
branes, made of environmentally friendly cotton, are intended to last for just one summer.The principle of the structure is convincingly simple: 4 double curved membrane surfaces on a square plan are spanned between steel sections that are stabilised against wind pressure and suction by means of tension and compression rods. Each canopy covers an area of 7.50 metres x 7.50 metres. The membrane surfaces are fixed linearly to edge beams and are post-tensioned by the process of fixing to the main beam. These beams also serve as gutters to lead rainwater runoff into a down pipe placed within the three-dimensional column.Each canopy can be coupled with further elements by means of bolted metal plates to create either linear or spreading forms. Makrolon coverings that extend beyond the edge beams
ensure that rain cannot enter through the connecting sections.

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